• By Sholnn Z. Freeman The Howard University Cancer Center closes out National Black Family Cancer Awareness Week (June 16-22) and Cancer Survivors Month in June with “More Than Conquerors: Stories of Survivorship, Hope and Courage.” National Black Family Cancer Awareness Week is an initiative of the Food and

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What the Biden Presidency could mean for HBCUs.

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Joe Biden’s apparent election as president could pave the way for a dramatic shift in higher education policies, possibly making tuition free for many seeking a college education and wiping away the debt of millions of people paying back student loans. Biden’s victory is also significant in its symbolism for higher education. Kamala Harris will be the nation’s first African American and Asian American vice president and, as a Howard University alumna, the first graduate of a historically Black university in the White House. The first lady will be Jill Biden, who until recently taught at a community college. There

Kamala Harris makes history as the first woman, person of color elected vice president

Kamala Harris Makes History As Next Vice President Vice President-elect Kamala Harris is the first woman, the first Black person and the first Asian American elected to the second highest office in the United States. Noah Berger/AFP via Getty Images California Sen. Kamala Harris will become the next vice president of the United States, shattering another racial and gender barrier in American politics, at the end of a bruising presidential race that further exposed a bitterly divided electorate. Harris, 56, will bring a legion of firsts to the vice presidency: A daughter of immigrants from India and Jamaica, she will

As the Black Vote Turns Out, America still has not declared a President.

With an increase in mail-ballots and millions of votes left uncounted in this election, America has not declared the next president of the United States. Former Vice President Joe Biden holds 243 electoral votes while President Trump holds 214. As the votes continue to be counted in every state, the best thing to do is to be “patient” according to NCCU Political Science Associate Professor Jarvis Hall in a post election Campus Echo interview. “North Carolina and Georgia— Those are the states that people are waiting for because they could determine whether Biden wins the presidency, or President Trump is

On this day 100 years ago, a White mob unleashed the deadliest Election Day violence in US history

It’s been 100 years since the Ocoee Massacre, a dark and often overlooked chapter in American history. On November 2, 1920, African American residents of Ocoee, Florida, went out to cast their ballots in the presidential election — no small task at the time. In the decades since Reconstruction, Florida politics had been dominated by White Southern Democrats, who fought to preserve slavery in the 1850s and had since obstructed African Americans from exercising their constitutional rights through violence, intimidation and legislation. But in the run-up to the 1920 election, Black people in Ocoee were registering to vote in droves —

Presidential candidates discuss plans for HBCU’s in their campaigns

November’s presidential election contains five candidates on the ballot who will bring different perspectives on how to address the needs of HBCUs and education for years to come. Each candidate’s views for HBCUs and education are different. From former Vice President Joe Biden’s proposal to spend over $70 billion to help upgrade HBCUs, to Libertarian Party candidate Jo Jorgensen’s proposal to end the Department of Education. The Campus Echo reached out to all five parties and campaigns to request interviews with the candidates or their representatives but could not arrange interviews. In researching the candidates’ campaign websites, one candidate addressed his

Young, Diverse, and Undecided Voters Identify Race and Money as Top Priority in Presidential Election

Complex Collective, Complex Networks’ primary audience insight research engine that offers a direct line to over 30,000 qualified, high-intent and diverse young people from all over the world, released its findings from a recent survey titled Untapped Potential: How To Mobilize Undecided & Disenfranchised Voters. The audience polled represented disproportionately Black, Hispanic, Women, and Gen Z, a group that makes up nearly two-thirds of the population eligible to vote this year. Collective focused on explaining who this youth electorate are, how they got here, and what it will take to get both undecided and disenfranchised voters to understand their vote’s overall impact on the

Trump says he saved historically Black colleges. Will that earn him votes?

After a summer of unrest and racial reckoning, Bryanna Thompson and Tia White found a refuge inside the gates of Bethune-Cookman University.Just out of high school, they had marched in protests across the state, including some in Tampa Bay. They had lost friendships, too. Following George Floyd’s death during an arrest by Minneapolis police, people they’d known since childhood revealed sentiments on social media that they couldn’t forgiveThe two, now 18-year-old college roommates, have since been plugged into politics. They watched the presidential debates and mailed their ballots as soon as they could. And both are happy they chose one

The annual REVOLT Summit x AT&T Relaunches Sean “Diddy” Combs’ VOTE or DIE! Initiative

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The annual REVOLT Summit x AT&T is bringing together the biggest names in Hip Hop and culture, including rappers and culture curators DaBaby, Killer Mike, Saweetie, and Tyga for an entirely virtual and free 3-day summit from October 23-25. The virtual event will continue the REVOLT Summit x AT&T tradition of creating viral, cultural moments with the young, Black, and vocal audience at the center of history-making events, instilling the idea that “the world is yours.” Panel conversations and workshops are set to explore the topics that are most relevant to the young Black artists and leaders of today. Featured panels and workshops include: NAVIGATING 2020: How

It’s not easy being the first but for Kamala Harris it has become a habit

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It took less than one day after Kamala Harris was announced as the Democratic vice-presidential nominee for a racist and baseless “birther” conspiracy theory to start circulating among her critics. The morning after Joe Biden named Harris as his running mate, making her the first black woman and the first Asian American to join a major party’s presidential ticket, Newsweek published an op-ed casting doubt upon the California senator’s US citizenship because she was born to immigrant parents.   The argument was immediately discredited by legal experts, who noted Harris was born in a hospital in Oakland, California, and was thus undeniably a US

Alabama Senator Doug Jones hosts drive-in rally to support of HBCUs

On the campaign trail, Senator Doug Jones was in Huntsville Sunday night for a drive-in rally supporting historically black colleges and universities at the Fellowship of Faith Church. Alabama has more HBCUs than any other state, with three in the Huntsville area alone. During his rally, Jones said it was important for those schools to know there’s someone who has their back in the senate. Students from numerous HBCUs along with other speakers took the stage before the senator was met with honks and flashes from an excited audience. In attendance were students like Aaron Wimberly, a member of Oakwood